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Contact Lenses

Over 30 million Americans wear contact lenses, according to the American Optometric Association. Unlike glasses, contact lenses move with your eyes so you can enjoy a larger field of vision with fewer distortions. You also don’t have to deal with frames hovering in your peripheral vision or external lenses that fog up on cold days or get wet in the rain.

There are many different kinds of contacts, including rigid and flexible, extended wear, disposable and planned replacement lenses. Some can be made as bifocals or in different colors. After a thorough eye exam and consultation with an experienced physician, patients who qualify for contact lenses can discuss which type is right for them. All contact lenses require special care and cleaning. You’ll need to make regular follow-up visits to ensure your eyes remain healthy.


Corneal Transplant

The cornea is the clear covering on the front of the eye which bends, or refracts, light rays that focus on the retina in the back of the eye. A certain shape or curvature is required in order for light to focus exactly on the retina, rather than in front of it or behind it.

An improperly curved cornea may be corrected surgically or non-invasively to reduce or eliminate the need for eyeglasses or contact lenses. A thorough eye examination and consultation are necessary before a treatment decision can be made.

Corneal transplantation, or keratoplasty, is recommended when the cornea’s curvature is too steep or flat to be treated with other methods, or when extensive damage has occurred due to disease, infection or injury. Common problems that require transplantation are:

  • Corneal Scarring
  • Herpes Simplex Keratopathy
  • Pseudophakic Corneal Decompensation
  • Keratoconus
  • Corneal Dystrophies
  • Traumatic injury
  • Chemical burn

Transplantation involves replacing the damaged cornea with a healthy one from a donor (usually through an eye bank). Keratoplasty is a low-risk procedure – it is the most common type of transplant surgery and has the highest success rate.

During the procedure, a circular incision is made in the cornea. A disc of tissue is removed and replaced with healthy tissue; these discs may be thin (lamellar keratoplasty) or as deep as the entire cornea (penetrating keratoplasty), depending on the eye problem. Local or general anesthesia may be used. The entire procedure takes only 30-90 minutes.


Glasses & Contact Lenses

Over 140 million people in the U.S. wear eyeglasses, and over 30 million wear contact lenses. Glasses and contact lenses improve vision by adjusting the way the eyes bend and focus light. Ideally, light rays are refracted (bent) as they pass through the cornea so that they focus on the retina in the back of the eye. In a healthy eye, this means that objects can be seen clearly. However, many people’s corneas have a shallow or steep curvature which causes light rays to focus in front of or behind the retina. Objects may then appear blurry at certain distances or at all distances.

Glasses and contact lenses correct these refractive errors. Prescriptions are measured for each eye so patients can enjoy optimal vision clarity, usually 20/20. Eyewear may be used for certain activities, such as reading for farsighted (hyperopic) patients and driving or watching television for nearsighted (myopic) patients, or may be worn at all times.

Regular eye exams test for the development and progression of refractive errors and help your optometrist provide a proper prescription if eyeglasses or contact lenses are needed. Exams are also an invaluable tool in the early detection of eye disease.

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ATTENTION FLORIDA EYE CLINIC PATIENTS

While we are not currently seeing patients for routine eye care, we are available to you and yours for urgent care, retina care and emergency visits. Please call us to meet your eye care needs. 407-834-7776

March 20, 2020

Dear Patients,

Many of you have recently been told by our office that your elective cataract surgery has been temporarily cancelled. We have been advised by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, and the Centers for Disease Control that we should stop all elective surgery immediately as a result of the Coronavirus epidemic. This recommendation includes cataract surgery and is in effect until further notice.

As surgeons we could never have imagined a situation in which we would not be allowed to offer a life changing procedure like cataract surgery. However, these are exceptional times. The recommendations to cease surgery are designed to protect the public health and to stop the spread of this disease.

As soon as we hear that this ban on elective surgery has been lifted, and that it is safe to offer surgery, our office will contact you to reschedule your procedure. Please do not call the office to ask for a reschedule date at this time as we do not know when we will be given the directive to restart surgery.

We appreciate your patience. Until then stay safe, and stay home.

Best regards,
Harry R. Pappas, M.D.
Peter Gruenberg, M.D.
Ross Parks, M.D.
James Jochum, M.D.
Catherine Wang, M.D.
Myhanh Nguyen, M.D.
David Letbetter, M.D.
Michelle Cho, M.D.
Bradley Shoss, M.D.
Thomas Steedle, M.D.
Samantha Xavier, M.D.
Stephanie Terrill, M.D.
Paul Chiranand, M.D.


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